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One more library, this time form Oslo, Norway. Built in 1913, architect Holger
Sinding-Larsen and renovated in 2005, Longva arkitekter AS and Østengen
og Bergo Landskapsarkitekter AS.

It adds to my personal collection of visited public libraries and renovated public buildings. This building definitely has a special charm, the period when it was originally designed is when the most notable Norwegian architecture was born.  Lighting design from Olso is especially charming and National library is no exception.

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The TU Delft central library, The Netherlands, designed by the Mecanoo architects designed in
1993 -1995 and built in 1996 -1997.

I walked on the green roof around the cone. The green roof was very pleasant to lay down and I could almost see myself happily rolling down the slope… However it started raining and I had rush down inside. The general feeling while walking on the roof  made me remember Oslo Opera House, I think the latter building was influenced by the former (also the shape of the entrance). The difference is that TU Delft library possesses feeling of human scale and the Oslo Opera house has much more sense of grandeur.

The entrance of the library is not accessible for handicapped people(that is surely due to building being relatively old, public awareness has changed, plus the laws have changed), and my attempts to photograph the front nicely were hindered by un-photogenic trash bins (what surely were not a part of original design).

Some more remarks about exterior – the random openings on the concrete wall by the entrance really amused me. Whether consciously architects realised it or not, the origins can be found on defensive walls and their shooting holes around the world, especially similar ones can be seen in Japanese castles.

Views of the library from outside and inside from the ground floor:

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Interior was pure visual and photographic pleasure. Easy to orient oneself, bright colours, calm and inspiring environment for study. Atrium in the cone structure, brings natural light down to the very center of the building.

Some more images of the library from the first level:

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The building won several awards: in 1998 National Steel Construction Prize by Dutch Steel Building Institute and in 2000 Award for the Millennium by Corus Construction.

This building is well known and probably seen before many times, but here I present my personal experiences and the building is indeed great!

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In 2004 the Oslo city government held a competition and Snøhetta architects won and executed the building.
Latter, in 2008 it was awarded in World Architecture Festival as a category winner.

Not only that I came into the Opera House several times (as well as walked around it), I also took a guided tour inside the building to see the areas what are normally closed for the visitors. Sadly no photos allowed in the backstage and other areas. During the tour it was very interesting to find out that there is a hidden inner courtyard with pretty landscaped garden in the middle. Around the courtyard rehearsal rooms and offices circle around.

Another amazing thing about this building is that it’s appearance changes with the weather. As you can see in the photos, the building blends in the surroundings completely: when it is grey and gloomy, it looks like just another ice lump; during colourful sunset, the buildings sparkles in the evening sun. It would be nice to see how it looks and feels during warm summer months.

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Interior is designed by several designers.

The exterior of the building possesses power and elegance, while the interior is softer.

These photos were taken at the exhibition and shop “To Declare” in the Old Customs Warehouse. The building itself is worth mentioning as it has just been brought back to life for cultural events and exhibitions. Helsinki Design Week was one of the first use after 40 or more years. It is an excellent example of reuse and change of function, however some things like sanitary will have to be installed inside some day.

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After enjoying the exhibition, especially the useful objects, I had a pleasure to listen to a presentation of a book in Finish and I decided not to take a copy – too much of corporate flavour or just too few pictures in it.

Later, rather unexpectedly, architect Carolina Bueno, partner at Triptyque Architecture gave a lecture and presented her works. She was full of energy and inspirational.

A run down romanticism style palace in Jurbarkas region, Lithuania, on a right side of river Nemunas (here). Originally built in the mid 19th century. Falling apart, but still full of amazing details.

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This building is in private hands since 2005 and hopefully something will be (is) done with this haunted mansion. There is hope, as nearby castle was being renovated at the moment I was visiting the area.
Belveder means “beautiful to see” – a popular name for houses in picturesque areas around the world.

I am starting off with a place what made me burst into tears after visiting – I missed out a lot by not studying here. That‘s an impression by just walking around and pretending to be a student.

TU Delft Faculty of Architecture :

Modelling area:

Plenty of model making machines (do not even have a clue what they are). As we discussed together with fellow architects: it is rather strange how much importance is put on modelling in architecture schools around the world. And the people who actually do get a chance to make models in real world are ether students/interns/part timers or specialised firms (non architects). Personally having worked in small offices only, I made a simple model once!

So called the Why Factory:

Lecture hall and auditorium designed by architects MVRDV and designer Richard Hutten.

tu delft architecture faculty book counter

Interesting counter made out of books.

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